News.me app launched

April 22, 2011 by  
Filed under Mobile, Technology

For all of us tragics who went to the blank news.me website all those months ago and signed up for an email alert, well today’s the day! News.me for iPad has launched. They’re saying all you need is an iPad and a Twitter account, but you don’t even need an iPad…

For those without an iPad, you can get the same stream ‘digest’ via email.

I’m yet to get beyond opening the app and authorising my Twitter account (it’s Good Friday!), but the recommended/featured users for me to follow were very digital news media centric. That’s great if the app has picked up on my area of interest already, based on my bio and who I follow.

I imagine it’s more than a glorified Twitter stream. It should be! You can get that through Flipboard, Zite, and numerous other great apps without paying a $1.19 per week subscription ($0.99 in US).

Read the full email from news.me below:

20110422-103603.jpg

News.me for iPad launched today! It’s available in the App Store for download: http://on.news.me/app-download.

News.me is a different kind of social news experience that shows you not just
what your friends are sharing on Twitter, but also what they are reading—a great opportunity to read over the proverbial shoulders of close friends and mega-interesting writers and thinkers alike. All you need is an iPad and a Twitter account to get started!

If you don’t have an iPad, you can still use News.me – just sign up to receive a daily email digest of the most interesting news flowing through your Twitter stream: http://www.news.me/email

Want to read more about News.me, how it started and who’s behind it?
http://www.borthwick.com/weblog/2011/02/21/news-me/

Thanks and let us know what you think!

Team News.me

twitter.com/newsdotme
feedback@news.me

Media Reading from the earley edition

November 23, 2010 by  
Filed under Media, Mobile, Social Networking, Training

I don’t have time to write real blog posts, as evidenced by my lack of updates here at the earley edition. Consider this a curated reading list of carefully selected items, which are of great and enduring import to the changing media landscape.

Or it’s just some random links I had time to take note of.

Enjoy.

  • Why Twitter matters for media organisations | Alan Rusbridger | Editor of The Guardian newspaper
    1. It’s an amazing form of distribution
    2. It’s where things happen first
    3. As a search engine, it rivals Google
    4. It’s a formidable aggregation tool
    5. It’s a great reporting tool
    6. It’s a fantastic form of marketing
    7. It’s a series of common conversations. Or it can be
    8. It’s more diverse
    9. It changes the tone of writing
    10. It’s a level playing field
    11. It has different news values
    12. It has a long attention span
    13. It creates communities
    14. It changes notions of authority
    15. It is an agent of change

    That’s just an excerpt of Alan Rusbridger’s full speech at the 2010 Andrew Olle Media Lecture, and it wasn’t all about Twitter. The full text, and audio, of Rusbridger’s speech, titled The Splintering of the Fourth Estate, is available from 702 ABC Sydney.

  • Blogging and commenting guidelines for journalists at The Guardian
    1. Participate in conversations about our content, and take responsibility for the conversations you start.
    2. Focus on the constructive by recognising and rewarding intelligent contributions.
    3. Don’t reward disruptive behaviour with attention, but report it when you find it.
    4. Link to sources for facts or statements you reference, and encourage others to do likewise.
    5. Declare personal interest when applicable. Be transparent about your affiliations, perspectives or previous coverage of a particular topic or individual.
    6. Be careful about blurring fact and opinion and consider carefully how your words could be (mis)interpreted or (mis)represented.
    7. Encourage readers to contribute perspective, additional knowledge and expertise. Acknowledge their additions.
    8. Exemplify our community standards in your contributions above and below the line.
  • 10 ways journalists can use Storify | Zombie Journalism
    1. Organizing reaction in social media.
    2. Giving back-story using past content.
    3. Curating topical content.
    4. Displaying a non-linear social media discussion or chat.
    5. Creating a multimedia/social media narrative.
    6. Organize your live tweets into a story
    7. Collaborate on a topic with readers.
    8. Create a timeline of events.
    9. Display audience content from across platforms.
    10. Live curate live tweets from the stream.
  • When Are Facebook Users Most Active? [STUDY]

    as in – when is your online audience most active?
    Here are some of the big takeaways:

    • The three biggest usage spikes tend to occur on weekdays at 11:00 a.m., 3:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. ET.
    • The biggest spike occurs at 3:00 p.m. ET on weekdays.
    • Weekday usage is pretty steady, however Wednesday at 3:00 pm ET is consistently the busiest period.
    • Fans are less active on Sunday compared to all other days of the week.
  • The top 10 key lessons for hyperlocal journalism startups from ONA10
    1. Successful doesn’t mean beautiful
    2. Legal stuff isn’t rocket science
    3. There is no such thing as free content
    4. Follow the data
    5. Focus on money from day one
    6. Advertisers are buying your audience, not funding your stories
    7. Grants don’t come for free
    8. Focus on multiple revenue models
    9. Technology should be fast and cheap
    10. Stop whining and just do it

Update

June 22, 2009 by  
Filed under Mobile, Podcasts

Julie Posetti was kind enough to link to this site from a recent PBS MediaShift article, Rules of Engagement for Journalists on Twitter. Unfortunately, I’ve managed to make the list of journalists she linked to completely disappear.
UPDATE: The list is back online, thanks to ireckon.com fixing some rogue code for me. Thanks Darryl!!

I made the fatal mistake of messing with the code on my live site, and have somehow broken the relevant post, Australia’s Top 100 Journalists and News Media People on Twitter.

Thinking I would make a minor change to the comments.php file last week, I have somehow managed to block out the most visited post on the site. It’s still there, you just can’t see it, and I haven’t worked out how to fix it.

I’ve already tried reposting, only to see the same effect. I’m convinced the problem is in the paged comments part of the code, but have either not restored to the original, or have but to no effect.

In the interim…
In other news, I’ve been catching up on some podcasts and just listened to a great Pods and Blogs episode from April 7. One of the things mentiond in the podcast was a live streaming news centre that was set up by some students to cover G20.

From the PodcastDirectory show description:

This week Jamillah talks to the students who created a news streaming page from the middle of the G20 protests when many reporters were unable to get in, or out, of the thick of it.

Some of what they did sounds awesome but I was put off, and disagree completely, with one of the students interviewed. They suggested what they had done could not necessarily be done by members of the public, that they were trained in the technology, and knew how to speak to the camera as a journalist.

As I said, I completely disagree. There are plenty of people all over the world who are better trained (and self-trained), who could do a better job of framing the story on video. Or with their voice, or a still image, a piece of art, a song, or a line of code that generates a visualisation.

People tell stories every day in different ways, to all sorts of other people

I rant. You can find the podcast on Pods and Blogs, BBC Radio Five Live.

I’ve also been catching up on Dave Winer and Jay Rosen‘s regular fireside chat, which they’ve named Rebooting the News. I’ve started from the beginning and only made it to about number four, but there has already been some good listening. Check it out.

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Interview with Dave Earley about Mobile Journalism – MoJo

April 8, 2009 by  
Filed under Media, Mobile, Videos

Mobile Journalism Toolkit for Pop!Tech Fellows...
Image by whiteafrican via Flickr

I had an interview request about mobile journalism, or mojo, from Air Force News of all places.
The editor, Simone Liebelt, is a former student of Deakin University academic and mobile journalism expert Stephen Quinn, who recommended me as “one of the pioneers in Australia” for the story on Mobile Journalism trends. The following are some of the answers I was going to email in, but we ended up talking over the phone.
Read on for my ideas about using mobile phones for news gathering.

Read more

An experiment in Mobile Journalism or MoJo

March 26, 2009 by  
Filed under Broadcast, Media, Mobile, Technology, Videos

Reuter's Got Mojo (that's mobile journalism)
Image by inju via Flickr

In January I experimented with a little mobile journalism, or MoJo, on a small story. Using Qik on a Dopod mobile phone, I live streamed video from the scene of a unit fire on Brisbane’s south side.

This was by no means an experiment in mobile journalism that even basically covered how MoJo could be done, it was simply a spur of the moment decision to give it a go. These are my thoughts on the process.

Read more

iPhone camera – breaking news nets pro photographer rates

January 7, 2009 by  
Filed under Delicious, Mobile, Print

An example of a breaking news intro graphicImage via Wikipedia

  • Just F8 and Be There, but faster :: Jim MacMillan: Blogging, News, Information and Opinion from Philadelphia
    People need to remember that MSM (mainstream media) need instant photos for online. MSM need to remember they should not just acknowledge the public for these pics, but remunerate where appropriate (exclusive/first). In this example, photos taken on an iPhone (remember, only a 2 megapixel camera) were paid for at the same rate as ‘pro’ photos.
    “After I sent another couple of photos, I […] found messages from the editor of philly.com […]. She had seen my Twitter posts and Twitpics, and was interested in getting them.
    I let her know that there were other pros working hard on the scene, but the Internet wants breaking news asap and – in a nutshell – she bought my pictures and posted one right away.
    I was compensated roughly on the scale that freelancers in this town are paid in traditional scenarios: for responding and shooting with pro-level Nikons or Canons, and delivering their photos via laptops with cell modems.”

Originally from my auto-posting daily Delicious links, I have cut this back to just the link I have added comment to. This is in preparation for a blog redesign, where I no longer want posts titled “links for YYYY-MM-DD”. A live stream of Delicious links will also always be available in a sidebar widget and/or stand-alone page.

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The arrogance of mainstream media, QR codes a new business model?, and all the tools you’ll ever need

January 6, 2009 by  
Filed under Delicious, Mobile, Online

Brockhaus Konversations-Lexicon, 1902Image via Wikipedia

  • Deconstructing the “real journalism” argument
    Terry Heaton takes a shot at the unending “woe, the internetz!” cries of mainstream media.
    “we’d get a lot further in the reinvention of professional journalism if we could get away from the belief that its an entitlement, one that’s necessary for the survival of the species […]
    “Who do we think we are? Surely our hubris has blinded us, for professional journalism never was God’s gift to culture […] We have done some good things, but our arrogance was our undoing. That arrogance is behind the notions that ‘real journalism’ can’t be practiced outside the paradigm of contemporary professional news.”
    (tags: online mediaindustry journalism media)
  • Why media companies are hosed
    “Wal-Mart is a media site in that it sells its reach to advertisers, a reach that vastly exceeds two of the top newspaper sites in the world. This is why I keep harping on everybody that the future for local media companies lies beyond their own walled garden websites, and those who refuse to hear that (like, everybody) are sprinting to the tar pits.”

    And an interesting viewpoint in the comments, suggesting QR codes could be the way of the future for cut-sized newspapers, providing direct mobile links to the full content.

    “Sooner or later, some newspaper people are going to figure out that the way to go is a 16- 24 page paper that mostly serves as a table of contents for info on the web.”
    (tags: mediaindustry future mobile qrcodes)

  • Tools for News
    A huge collection of “Tool kits” for everything you need for online content creation, whether you call yourself a digital journalist, online journalist, or you create content for family, friends or any other community you’re a part of.
    Check it out and get creative.
    (tags: digital howto newmedia tools reporting tutorial)

Originally from my auto-posting daily Delicious links, I have cut this back to just a few links I have added comment to and that I think particularly useful. I have also retitled the post. This is in preparation for a blog redesign, where I no longer want posts titled “links for YYYY-MM-DD”. A live stream of Delicious links will also always be available in a sidebar widget and/or stand-alone page.

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How journalists should use Twitter

December 3, 2008 by  
Filed under Journalists, Media, Mobile, Online, Social Networking

Today the Columbia Journalism Review has posed the question, How should journalists use Twitter? The question comes out of yet another emergency of global significance where the news spread rapidly on Twitter – this time the Mumbai terror attacks

Go to CJR to read their brief introduction to what is more of a newsroom discussion being conducted in the comments. There are some good points made.

This is my initial reaction…
Online news has been in various places (including the recent MEAA Future of Journalism report) described as more “event-driven”, with a lack of analysis that has formerly balanced out the print edition. I disagree that all news has been balanced in that way. Read more

Future of Journalism – Brisbane

September 17, 2008 by  
Filed under Media, Mobile, News, Online, Print, Social Networking, Videos

MEAA - Future of Journalism logoI’m not going to go into the Future of Journalism conference last Saturday in any great detail.
There is a post on the Future of Journalism’s Wired Scribe blog with a roundup of several good links to posts by people who were observers and panelists on the day. Interested people can read a roundup there.

You can also read through the live Future of Journalism tweets from various people on the day.

What I’m providing here is just a quick video of a question I asked of news.com.au editor David Higgins about the use of social networking tools for newsgathering.

Video after the jump…

Read more

aTwitter

September 11, 2008 by  
Filed under Journalists, Mobile, Online, SMO, Social Networking

This blog has not been updated in almost two months. I would always prefer that were not the case and, as I’ve said before, I hope to remedy that with more frequent posting. For some reason my daily Delicious links haven’t been posting, but my Twitter updates in the sidebar have been flying along at an increasing pace.

Twitter logoOn Monday I hit 700 Twitter updates since signing up to Twitter just over 12 months ago. Since Monday I have posted another 125+ updates, reaching nearly 300 updates in the first 11 days of September. Excessive? Read more

Mobile platform delivery begets mobile journalism – mojo

Electric NewspaperImage by mushon via Flickr

Originally from my auto-posting daily Delicious links, I have cut this back to just a few links I have added comment to or that I think particularly useful. I have also retitled the post. This is in preparation for a blog redesign, where I no longer want posts titled “links for YYYY-MM-DD”. A live stream of Delicious links will also always be available in a sidebar widget and/or stand-alone page.

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HOW TO: Get reporters out into the community

July 21, 2008 by  
Filed under Delicious, Journalists, Mobile

Mr. Pagination GuyImage by Bill on Capitol Hill via Flickr

  • “we MUST understand and then embrace the notion that print is no longer our primary focus.
    ..reporters chained to desks working with large desktop computers..so last century..Transition them to laptops..get them out of the newsroom and into the community”
  • How important is comprehensible data presentation to new journalism?
    “visualisation is a way to turn usually a lot of numbers into images, so you can look at all the data that you have at the same time and try to see patterns – or interesting trends…”

Originally from my auto-posting daily Delicious links, I have cut this back to just a few links I have added comment to and that I think particularly useful. I have also retitled the post. This is in preparation for a blog redesign, where I no longer want posts titled “links for YYYY-MM-DD”. A live stream of Delicious links will also always be available in a sidebar widget and/or stand-alone page.

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Mobile journalism, citizen journalism and virtual worlds

July 15, 2008 by  
Filed under Delicious, Mobile, Online

Originally from my auto-posting daily Delicious links, I have cut this back to just a few links I have added comment to and those I think particularly useful. I have also retitled the post. This is in preparation for a blog redesign, where I no longer want posts titled “links for YYYY-MM-DD”. A live stream of Delicious links will also always be available in a sidebar widget and/or stand-alone page.

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iPhone Australia released on Vodafone

May 6, 2008 by  
Filed under Media, Mobile, News, Technology

iPhoneHow’s this for awesome? I am of course buying into the hype that is everything Apple, particularly the iPhone, which is yet to be released in Australia.

Vodafone announced today they have signed a deal to sell the iPhone in ten of its global markets, including Australia, ‘later this year’.

Tuesday 6 May 2008

Vodafone to offer Apple’s iPhone in ten markets

Vodafone today announced it has signed an agreement with Apple to sell the iPhone in ten of its markets around the globe. Later this year, Vodafone customers in Australia, the Czech Republic, Egypt, Greece, Italy, India, Portugal, New Zealand, South Africa and Turkey will be able to purchase the iPhone for use on the Vodafone network.

You have plenty of other multi-purpose phones – smart phone, PDA phone, Pocket PC phone – all of which do lots of good things. Is the iPhone the best? How does it rate against the others?

The mobile world is advancing towards that mythical ‘all-in-one’ device that can not only effectively meet the demand for multimedia use of phone, video, audio, image and web, but also realistically meet the needs of those publishing content on the go.

It’s a mobile revolution. The Nokia N95 can’t be bad if it’s the mobile platform of choice for the Reuters Mojo team, so does the iPhone live up to the hype?